Sci fi movie essay

According to McIntosh, the Born Sexy Yesterday phenomenon depicts the running trope in sci-fi and adjacent films that pairs lonely, forlorn dudes with female characters that carry the “mind of a child” in a “mature female body.” Using numerous examples from movies like Tron: Legacy , The Fifth Element , Splash, Enchanted , Forbidden Planet ( and pretty much any other sci-fi film from the ’50s), the video outlines how these characters cater to a male fantasy of innocence and sexual purity, the kind that places the man in a place of power to represent “the ultimate teacher-student dynamic.” By being the only man in the lives of these women, the protagonists of these films “automatically become the most extraordinary man” in her life. The video also explores how the trope functions when the gender roles are reversed or when both genders find themselves in a similar state of “innocence.”

“Quintet” (1979)
The eclectic and uneven career of Robert Altman saw the filmmaker tackle practically every genre under the sun, (westerns, noirs, ‘30s gangster movies, mysteries, gumshoe dick movies) minus maybe a straight-up action film. But Altman was never interested in genre much, always placing the emphasis on more human behavior and interaction, so it’s not a surprise his ill-fated attempt at sci-fi with “ Quintet ” didn’t exactly work. Set in a wintry, post-apocalyptic future where a new ice age has ravaged Earth, “Quintet” stars Paul Newman (they would collaborate only twice – both collaborations were less than stellar) as a man named Essex, a survivor in a barren, unflaggingly frozen wasteland, who gets drawn into a mysterious game called “Quintet” after being attacked and nearly killed by a gambler. The game, it turns out, is a kind of role playing game, but if you’re killed in the game, you’re also murdered in real life. (Someone uploaded a PDF of the game’s “rules,” part of the promotional materials, online. Read them here .) While Altman does a great job of sustaining an atmosphere and mood of dreadful unpredictability (though arguably this just means smearing the camera with gauzy vaseline the entire time), there are long, quiet, arguably agonizing, stretches of “Quintet” where nothing really happens (released two years after “ Star Wars ,” and the same year as “ Alien ,” you can see why genre fans were also unresponsive). Co-starring some fantastic international stars that probably asked themselves what they were doing in this film ( Fernando Rey, Vittorio Gassman, Bibi Andersson ), “Quintet” is undeniably a fascinating blip on Altman’s filmography, and a precursor to more widely accepted things like “ Battle Royale ” and “ The Hunger Games .” Newman’s performance, too, is a tightly coiled one, all wild nerves and raw instinct. Too bad about the languid polar ice-cap pace. Bonus weirdly futuristic points go to the film’s shooting location: the site of the Montreal Expo 67 World’s Fair.

With Jim Henson, Frank Oz directed The Dark Crystal (1982) , a delightful children's fantasy tale with Muppets. Henson also directed the George Lucas-produced Labyrinth (1986) starring teenaged babysitter Jennifer Connelly in an enchanted land inhabited by Henson's Muppets (as monsters), trying to solve a fantastic, challenging maze in order to rescue her baby brother from the evil Goblin King (David Bowie). The last film produced by Jim Henson was British director Nicolas Roeg's adventure-fantasy The Witches (1990) - adapted from Roald Dahl's novel of the same name, with trademark special effects through animatronics, and Anjelica Huston as a frightening Grand High Witch that threatens to turn two young boys into mice at a seaside hotel convention of witches.

Only a few films are transcendent, and work upon our minds and imaginations like music or prayer or a vast belittling landscape. Most movies are about characters with a goal in mind, who obtain it after difficulties either comic or dramatic. “2001: A Space Odyssey'' is not about a goal but about a quest, a need. It does not hook its effects on specific plot points, nor does it ask us to identify with Dave Bowman or any other character. It says to us: We became men when we learned to think. Our minds have given us the tools to understand where we live and who we are. Now it is time to move on to the next step, to know that we live not on a planet but among the stars, and that we are not flesh but intelligence.

Sci fi movie essay

sci fi movie essay

Only a few films are transcendent, and work upon our minds and imaginations like music or prayer or a vast belittling landscape. Most movies are about characters with a goal in mind, who obtain it after difficulties either comic or dramatic. “2001: A Space Odyssey'' is not about a goal but about a quest, a need. It does not hook its effects on specific plot points, nor does it ask us to identify with Dave Bowman or any other character. It says to us: We became men when we learned to think. Our minds have given us the tools to understand where we live and who we are. Now it is time to move on to the next step, to know that we live not on a planet but among the stars, and that we are not flesh but intelligence.

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