Two kinds by amy tan analysis essay

I started a second novel seven times and I had to throw them away. You know, 100 pages here, 200 pages there, and I’d say, “Is this what they liked in The Joy Luck Club? Is this the style, is this the story? No, I must write something completely different. I must write no Chinese characters to prove that I’m multi-talented.” Or “No, I must write this way in a very erudite way to show I have a way to use big words.” It’s both rebellion and conformity that attack you with success. It took me a long time to get over that, and just finally being able to breathe again and say, “What’s important? Why are you a writer? Why did you write that book in the first place? What did you learn? What did you discover? What was the most rewarding part of that?” Don’t think of what’s going to happen afterwards. If it’s a failure, will you think what you wrote was a failure, that the whole time was wasted? If it’s a success, will you think the words are more valuable? That crisis helped me to define what was important for me. It started off with family. It started off with knowing myself, with knowing the things I wanted as a constant in my life: trust, love, kindness, a sense of appreciation, gratitude. I didn’t want to become cynical. I didn’t want to become a suspicious person. Those were the things that helped me decide what I was going to write.

Because the story revolves around relationships between mother and daughter, I would write my thesis statement to reflect this component. It does not need to specifically concentrate on relationships between mothers and daughters. It could generally address the struggle that parents and children face in trying to understand the two very different worlds each one occupies. For while we may believe we know what another person is going through, can this ever really be true? A mother was once a child and a teenager herself, but it was during a different time in society. For Suyuan (June's mother), her past was based in an entirely different era and culture. Even the forms of communication in China and America are vastly different. Another element of the story concentrates upon the inability of this mother and daughter to communicate effectively, especially because of the difference of the two cultures in which they have been raised. So I would reflect in the writing the difficulty of developing functional communication and relationships in the face of changing times and cultures. My thesis statement would be something like:

"Two Kinds" tells of a woman and daughter expecting a great life in America. The daughter, Jing-mei, wants desperately to become a "Chinese Shirley Temple" by making a career in singing and dancing. Her mother is consumed in the belief that Jing-mei is a genius, thus making her do pointless tests that she sees other prodigy children doing in magazines such as standing on her head and reciting world capitals. All of this proves to be useless and the idea begins to fade away until Jing-mei's mother decides to make Jing-mei take piano lessons with their neighbor, Mr. Chong. The ex-pianist is, however, deaf and has poor eyesight. Having a teacher with disabilities gives her the ability to play as she wants to and ultimately not learn. A talent show ensues and her mother signs her up out of pride toward her friend Lindo Jong, whose daughter is a prodigy chess player. She plays a song called Pleading Child and does absolutely terrible. She thought her mother would be mad because the whole town was there watching. Surprising to Jing-Mei, her mother says nothing to her about the recital. Later, her mother asks if she is going to the piano lessons. Thinking that the recital was bad enough for her mother to have a notion that she wanted to quit, she declined. Forcing her to go, Jing-Mei exclaims "I wish I had never been born; I wish I were dead! Like them [her babies in China]." This left a blank face on her mother, horrified by what her daughter had remarked. The piano lessons had stopped and she didn't have to do any of the trivial tests her mother had forced her to do before. Her mother dies and as an adult and Jing-mei is asked to take the old piano and her notes. She takes the piano into her home and begins playing through her old music. She finds that the song "Pleading Child" was only half of the song she had been playing. The other half was called "Perfectly Contented." [5]

I made a "Quilted Noticeboard" and enjoyed every moment of it.  Not only was it a quick make, but I love how it turned out.  I also really enjoyed going scrappy on it ~ using prints from many different collections by Art Gallery Fabrics and throwing in some AGF linen, of course.  If you're familiar with Sedef's noticeboard pattern, you may notice that mine looks a little different than hers, but that's because I made a miscalculation near the beginning and then ended up improvising.  To tell you the truth, I don't even follow my own patterns -exactly- most of the time.  But the bones of this project are just as Sedef prescribed and the genius part is her direction to use fusible foam instead of batting.  Foam adds the perfect amount of stability for this noticeboard and I'm so happy I keep it on hand.  (Note: I use Pellon Flex Foam FF78F1)

Two kinds by amy tan analysis essay

two kinds by amy tan analysis essay

I made a "Quilted Noticeboard" and enjoyed every moment of it.  Not only was it a quick make, but I love how it turned out.  I also really enjoyed going scrappy on it ~ using prints from many different collections by Art Gallery Fabrics and throwing in some AGF linen, of course.  If you're familiar with Sedef's noticeboard pattern, you may notice that mine looks a little different than hers, but that's because I made a miscalculation near the beginning and then ended up improvising.  To tell you the truth, I don't even follow my own patterns -exactly- most of the time.  But the bones of this project are just as Sedef prescribed and the genius part is her direction to use fusible foam instead of batting.  Foam adds the perfect amount of stability for this noticeboard and I'm so happy I keep it on hand.  (Note: I use Pellon Flex Foam FF78F1)

Media:

two kinds by amy tan analysis essaytwo kinds by amy tan analysis essaytwo kinds by amy tan analysis essaytwo kinds by amy tan analysis essay